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The Science Behind Firework Colours

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Fireworks are a staple of many celebrations around the world. They are a beautiful and awe-inspiring sight, and their colours are one of the things that make them so special. But how do fireworks get their colours?

The answer is actually quite simple: it all comes down to chemistry. Fireworks are made up of a variety of chemicals, each of which produces a different colour when it is ignited. The most common chemicals used in fireworks are:

  • Strontium produces a red colour.
  • Barium produces a green colour.
  • Copper produces a blue colour.
  • Sodium produces a yellow colour.

These chemicals are combined with other materials, such as gunpowder, to create the fireworks that we see. When the fireworks are ignited, the chemicals react with each other and release energy in the form of heat and light. The different colours of light are produced by the different wavelengths of light that are emitted when the chemicals react.

For example, strontium produces a red colour because it emits light with a wavelength of about 650 nanometers. This is the same wavelength of light that is emitted by red hot objects, such as a burning piece of coal. Barium produces a green colour because it emits light with a wavelength of about 550 nanometers. This is the same wavelength of light that is emitted by green plants. Copper produces a blue colour because it emits light with a wavelength of about 450 nanometers. This is the same wavelength of light that is emitted by the sky on a clear day.

The different colours of fireworks can be combined to create a wide variety of effects. For example, a firework that contains both strontium and barium will produce a red and green colour

Fireworks are a beautiful and exciting way to celebrate special occasions. The next time you see a fireworks display, take a moment to appreciate the science behind the colours. It is truly amazing what can be created with a little bit of chemistry.

In addition to the chemicals listed above, there are a number of other chemicals that can be used to produce different colours in fireworks. For example, lithium produces a violet colour, calcium produces an orange colour, and potassium produces a purple colour. The possibilities are endless!

Firework makers have been experimenting with different combinations of chemicals for centuries, and they continue to develop new and innovative ways to create beautiful and awe-inspiring fireworks displays. The next time you see a fireworks show, take a moment to appreciate the artistry and science that went into creating it.

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